Tibet

Tibet

QOMOLANGMA – THE SNOW GODDESS OF MOUNT EVEREST, TIBET

This is the story of the most spectacular photo I have ever taken.

In the summer of 2000, I made an agreement with the University of Hawaii at Hilo (UHH) to conduct independent research in Tibet. I proposed to travel overland from Lhasa to Kathmandu, Nepal.

My Liberal Studies Adviser, Prof. John Cheng, agreed, providing I kept a detailed photo journal of my travels.

Dr Steven Andrew Martin - Mount Everest Tibet

Standing at a mountain pass inside the Qomolangma National Nature Preserve with Mount Everest in the background

Topographic map of Tibet featuring Lhasa and Mount Everest [click to view in full HD]

Lhasa, Tibet – Qomolangma National Nature Reserve

After a month-long study abroad program with the University of Hawaii, ending in Chengdu, southwestern China, I set out with two students, to Tibet.

I planned to travel southwest from Lhasa, by Toyota Land Cruiser, across the fertile valleys of Xigazê and Gyantse. These ancient cultural and religious centers are the gateway to the Tingri Plain, a 4,500 meter-high basin located north of Mount Everest.

The trip began inauspiciously. As mandated by the Chinese visa restrictions in Beijing, I had booked through the China International Travel Service, CITS, for the hire of a Toyota Land Cruiser and local driver for two weeks, as well as a national guide and an international guide – not a cheap excursion by any means. I had paid in advance for what I hoped would be a relatively new model to get us over the mountains and difficult terrain ahead. What actually appeared outside the CITS office in Lhasa that morning was an ancient, battered truck with bald tires, stinking of fuel from what was clearly a leaking tank. The less said about the social skills of the Chinese driver, the better.

Within ten minutes of sitting in the fume-filled truck, I was physically sick. I made the decision that there was no way I was going to spend two weeks like this, and insisted that the driver turn around and head back to the CITS.

Smiling, but unyielding, I explained quietly and politely to a series of CITS officials that the truck was unsafe, and unlikely to get us to Everest.

After several hours of this, I was very relieved to see the arrival of Mr Quan, a distinguished-looking driver in a beautiful late-model Toyota Land Cruiser. We were back on the road.

And so it came to pass that Mr Quan, myself, my two students Kawika and Aaron, our national guide, Mr. Wu, and our international guide, Nancy Lan, set off for Everest.

Over the next few days, I learned that Mr. Quan was indeed a driver of quality, who had previously served many dignitaries on past tours, including the Kennedy family from the United States and other international government officials.

Ancient rock art - Lhasa Tibet - Steven Andrew Martin

Ancient rock art near Lhasa

Potala Palace - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Potala Palace, former residence of the Dali Lama

national guide, Mr Wu - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

National guide, Mr Wu

Temple door - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Temple door with Buddha images

International Chinese tour guide Tibet - Photo journal - Dr Steven A Martin

International guide, Nancy Lan

Tibeten Books - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Tibetan Buddhist scriptures

Tibetan Village Xigazê Tibet Journal Steven Andrew Martin

Tibetan village on the way to Xigazê

Prayer flags mountain pass Tibet Journal Steven Andrew Martin

Prayer flags at a mountain pass on the way to Xigazê

Tibetan farmer Xigazê Tibet Journal Steven Andrew Martin

Tibetan farmer standing in a field of green barley on the way to Xigazê

Valleys, villages, and mountain passes

With Mr. Quan at the wheel, we crossed though expansive valleys with fields of yellow rapeseed flowers and visited small traditional Tibetan villages. We cautiously drove up steep, dangerous switchback roads to high-mountain passes, some at 16,000 feet or more.

At each pass, we stopped to check the vehicle, especially the brakes, before descending to the next valley. I followed local tradition by tying prayer flags to shrines to thank the spirits for our safe passage, and send peaceful mantras in the wind.

The open road - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Chinese trucks passing by on the open road

Rapeseed - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Rapeseed, locally called youcai zi (油菜籽)

Prayer flags on a mountain pass - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Prayer flags on a mountain pass

Toyota Land Cruiser and driver, Mr Quan - Tibet Journal Steven Andrew Martin

Left, our Land Cruiser – Right, our Chinese driver, Mr Quan

Tibetan village visit - Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Tibetan village visit

Tibetan woman - Steven Andrew Martin - Tibet Photo Journal

Tibetan village visit

Prayer stones - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Prayer stones at the village

Mountain stream - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Crossing a mountain stream on the Tingri Plain

mountain barley - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Fields of mountain barley in a picturesque valley

Qomolangma National Nature Preserve

Entering Qomolangma National Nature Preserve, we headed to the Rongbuck Monastery to photograph the north face of Mount Everest. Our Land Cruiser powered up the last mountain pass of the trip, through sunny skies and cold winds, and as occasional gaps appeared in the clouds, we caught distant glimpses of Everest across the most impressively massive valley I ever saw. (See photo top of this page).

Qomolangma National Nature Reserve - Dr Steven Andrew Martin - Mount Everest National Preserve

Qomolangma National Nature Preserve

Supply truck - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Supply truck on the Tingi Plain

Sheep crossing the Rongbuck Stream - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Sheep crossing the Rongbuck Stream

Everest from the Rongbuk Monastery - Steven Andrew Martin Journal

Everest from the Rongbuk Monastery

Rongbuck glacial valley - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Rongbuck glacial valley at the foot of Everest. Bottom right, my guide, Nancy Lan.

Mount Everest black and hhite - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Mount Everest with black and white film

About this photo – Mount Everest

South from the Rongbuck Monastery, across a glacial valley of naturally-crushed grey rock, I hiked to nearly 18,000 feet and stood at the foot of Everest. The north face of the mountain towered nearly 10,000 feet above.

The air was thin and the wind reddened my skin. I set up the camera and took pictures, in color slides and black and white prints, but Everest had a mind of its own.

As quickly as the summit appeared through the rapidly moving clouds, it was gone from sight. I had seen just enough to know it was there; but for several hours, until nearly dark, I saw only grey clouds breaking across the summit.

It was getting dark and dangerously late to return to camp, and I scrabbled down the glacier feeling somewhat defeated, reflecting on the stories I'd read of climbers who spent years planning and training, only to fail in their bid for the summit.

The truck started, and we drove away in the darkness with the mountain at our back. As I was reaching for something behind me, I caught from the corner of my eye the sight of a sudden change of wind. In seconds, the east wind whipped away the covering clouds from the mountain, revealing the full magnificence of Everest in crystal clarity.

Qomolangma, the legendary goddess of the mountain, was miraculously lifting her veil.

"Stop!" I told Mr. Quan. "Wait!"

I gathered my gear and launched out of the truck, fumbling to get a shot before the surreal moment was gone.

I knew it was the perfect photo of the top of the world.

Mount Everest - Tibet Photo Journal - Steven Andrew Martin

Mount Everest from the Rongbuk Glacier

Thank you for visiting my Tibet photo journal page.

Steven A. Martin