English Language Tutor & Life Coach

English Language Tutor & Life Coach

“Surf Doctor” Steven Andrew Martin

Professor of Area Studies in Sociology and Anthropology

English Language Tutor and Life Coach for International Students and Teachers of All Ages and Backgrounds

Hello! I’m Steven, a recently retired Professor of Asian Studies in Sociology and Anthropology.

My online English tutor name is “Surf Doctor” because I developed the “Surf Resource Sustainability Index” as part of my PhD in Environmental Management.

English Tutor and Academic Advisor Intro Video for Professor “Surf Doctor” Steven Andrew Martin

I have deep experience with second language learning because I was an international student.

I studied Mandarin in China 北京大学 and Taiwan 政治大學 , Spanish in Costa Rica and Spain, and Afrikaans and Xhosa in South Africa. I can also speak Hawaiian-style English, or “Pidgin English”, the common language spoken throughout the Hawaiian Islands today.

Although I am recently retired from university, I continue contributing to international education through online teaching and learning platforms. If you would like to connect with me for a lesson or consultation in English, please send a brief message here on my website contact page.

In 2022, I met with over 1,000 students from 56 countries, many of which were from China and Japan.

After retiring from university, 2022 marked my first full year of teaching online as an independent English language tutor and educator across various topics, subjects, and disciplines of study.

2022 Online English Language Teaching Statistics

Special topics of interest among my international students

In recent years, I have helped learners from around the world. Popular topics currently include:

  • Life Coaching through conversational English – A learner-centered approach.
  • Work life balance and and other life philosophies.
  • World knowledge – Exploring life and the world around us through experiential language learning.
  • New enlightenment philosophy – Revisiting how we measure personal and professional success in a world of unprecedented social change.
  • Learning Adventures – Discussing traditional, formal, academic, and time-orientated education and knowledge - in contrast with - untraditional, incidental, accidental, and experiential learning.
  • Content English – Learning English in the context of special topics of interest, such as those related to school or university classes, courses, or other subject areas. Example: "Weather words".
  • Conscious versus unconscious English language learning – Exploring "Graded Readers".
  • International travel consulting and life experience. See: The Jewel of Travel.
  • Study abroad and international education opportunities.
  • International planning for Asian students intending to live or study in Europe, United States, or Canada.
  • Visa applications and processes for travel or education.
  • University applications and admissions.
  • Resume and CV building and editing.
  • Research, writing, and editing, including university theses and academic papers.
  • Systematic research and publication, including international journal articles.
  • Health, wellness, and the food environment – understanding organic foods and farming.
  • Chinese culture and philosophy 中国哲学 , including the Silk Road 絲綢之路 and the Journey to the West.
  • Anthropology and the indigenous Taiwanese peoples.
  • The sport and philosophy of surfing.
  • Hawaiian culture and history.
  • Developing new and personal life philosophies.
  • Exploring and understanding different measures of success.
  • How and why to build a personal website for yourself and others.

Subjects which I taught as a university professor and continue to share and discuss online with students of all ages and backgrounds

Learning though Content English

Content English is generally understood as a set of vocabulary or world knowledge of a specific subject taught in English. I further define content-based English language learning as a way of empowering students through combining language, literacy, and content knowledge of a given topic, subject, or study area in a real-world context.

Having knowledge of a specialized English vocabulary in the context of a given subject facilitates deeper ‘learning access’ to the world, allowing learners find their own voice and world concept through English.

As a university professor and experienced English language tutor, I do my best to bring the world to my lessons and my lessons to life, encouraging an ‘English journey’ through engaging students to shape their world view in their own words as global citizens.

Teaching English as a Foreign Language

Continuing Education in English Language Learning and (TEFL)

With online English language learning increasing in popularity, I decided to enroll in a 120 hour TEFL course (Teaching English as a Foreign Language), the global standard certificate for English teachers, particularly those who live and work abroad. It was a great way to learn new online teaching skills and strategies, and I completed the TEFL program on December 4, 2023. The course was accredited through the International Council for Online Educational Standards (ICOES) as a Continuing Professional Development (CPD) activity.

Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL) – International Council for Online Educational Standards (ICOES) TEFL Certificate

International Open Academy (IOA) 120 Hour TEFL Certificate

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in Teaching English as a Foreign Language

Life Coaching Through Conversational English

A Learner-centered Approach

I recently completed a certificate in Coaching Skills for Learner-centered Conversations with Imperial College London, a global top 10 university in the United Kingdom. The course was focus on how to hold “effective conversations leading to meaningful change.”

“Coaching is unlocking people’s potential to maximize their own performance. It is helping them to learn rather than teaching them.” – Sir John Whitmore

The learner-centered approach to life coaching is based on the idea that people are resourceful, with inner strengths and capabilities. Coaching differs from conventional teaching as the educator’s role broadens from expert to genuine facilitator of learning-in equal partnership with learners within a relationship of respect.

“A coach assumes that there is a solution for the learner’s needs and that learners can find solutions themselves because of their own inner wisdom.” – London Imperial College

In an education setting, life coaching is based on an acquired skillset based on effective conversations leading to meaningful change, one where the educator actively listens, reflects, and asks powerful questions to support the learner to develop new perspectives and new thinking. In this way, the learner is empowered to move forward with their issue.

Coaching Skills for Learner-Centered Conversations | London Imperial College

Asst. Professor “Surf Doctor” Steven Andrew Martin Retires with Certificate of Honor at 2022 University Ceremony

Asst. Professor “Surf Doctor” Steven Andrew Martin Retires with Certificate of Honor at 2022 University Ceremony

'Retirement' or 'Graduation'?

The grand Prince of Songkla University Retirement Ceremony (called 'Mutita Chit'), with gifts, flowers, and a gold-framed certificate, was like graduating with one final university degree, representing the start of a new chapter in life!

Asst. Professor Steven "Surf Doctor" Martin Retires with a Certificate of Honor for Service and Dedication at the September 2022 Prince of Songkla University Retirement Ceremony in Phuket, Thailand

Steven with long-time colleague and coauthor, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Raymond J. Ritchie with the Faculty of Technology and Environment

Awards and gifts from Prince of Songkla University faculty and staff

Special gifts from PSU Phuket campus faculty and staff

Faculty of International Studies Letter of Appreciation and Recommendation

Official University Letters of Recognition and Retirement

A Systematic Review of Surf Tourism Research in International Journals (2011-2020)

A Systematic Review of Surf Tourism Research in International Journals (2011-2020)

JOURNAL OF SPORT & TOURISM | 2022 RESEARCH PUBLICATION

From Shades of Grey to Web of Science: A Systematic Review of Surf Tourism Research in International Journals (2011-2020)

Martin, S. A. (2022). From shades of grey to Web of Science: A systematic review of surf tourism research in international journals (2011-2020). Journal of Sport & Tourism, 26(2), 125–146. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14775085.2022.2037453

Abstract

Previous research outlined the genesis of a new body of surf tourism research based on a wide array of grey and published literature (Martin & Assenov, 2012). The aim of this paper is to further investigate the development of the field through an evidence-based informetric analysis of international journal articles listed in Web of Science or Scopus databases. Employing a systematic review of journal papers published from 2011 to 2020, the study addresses the previous grey literature problem of accessibility and eligibility criteria for citation. Findings are drawn from explicit and tangential studies which capture an up-to-date overview of the evolution of surf tourism research. The study identifies active journals, authors, field locations, and leading areas of research, suggesting that the field has entered a period of ‘academic professionalization’. A bibliography of 96 journal articles presents academics and readers with a corpus of accessible research.

Keywords: citation criteria; Scopus; surf tourism research; systematic review; Web of Science

The Last Refuge and Forced Migration of a Taiwanese Indigenous People During the Japanese Colonization of Taiwan – An Ethnohistory | Journal of Nationalism and Ethnic Politics

The Last Refuge and Forced Migration of a Taiwanese Indigenous People During the Japanese Colonization of Taiwan – An Ethnohistory | Journal of Nationalism and Ethnic Politics

THE 1941 NEIBENLU (LAIPUNUK) INCIDENT

本鹿事件

A CRITICAL EVENT IN THE ORAL HISTORY OF THE BUNUN

Steven A. Martin & David Blundell

Journal of Nationalism and Ethnic Politics

Cite

Martin, S. A., & Blundell, D. (2022). The last refuge and forced migration of a Taiwanese indigenous people during the Japanese colonization of Taiwan – An ethnohistory. Nationalism and Ethnic Politics, 28(2) 206–231. https://doi.org/10.1080/13537113.2021.2011545

ABSTRACT

Through ethnohistorical studies, this paper explores social and political perspectives during the Japanese colonization of Taiwan which led to the forced resettlement of an entire indigenous society. Ethnographic life histories and translations of official Japanese police announcements are used to explore the 1941 Neibenlu (Laipunuk) Incident (內本鹿事件), a critical event in the oral history of the Bunun, a Taiwanese (Formosan) indigenous people of the southern mountains of Taiwan. We examine the reopening of Neibenlu’s Japanese mountain trail and its police stations offering new access to Bunun heritage to inform present and future generations. The study offers an innovative account of a neglected topic of indigenous resistance to imperialism, combining oral ethnography, and historical textual analysis.

Keywords: Bunun; forced migration; Japanese colonization of Taiwan; Laipunuk; Neibenlu (內本鹿); Taiwanese (Formosan) indigenous peoples

Select Figures from the Research

The Last Refuge and Forced Migration of a Taiwanese Indigenous People During the Japanese Colonization of Taiwan – An Ethnohistory

Available @ the journal of Nationalism and Ethnic Politics

Scopus Indexed (Q2)

Web of Science Indexed (Q2)

Teaching Demo

Teaching Demo

Teaching Demo for the Position of Associate Professor of Asian Studies in Sociology and Anthropology

In Thailand, a teaching demo is just one of the many elements required when applying for an academic title, such as assistant or associate professor.

Prince of Songkla University | Faculty of International Studies

The purpose of a teaching demo is to demonstrate the applicant’s ability to teach, including the use of new technologies, innovation, and integration of personal experience and research.

Additionally, fostering student participation through active learning is increasingly important.

Teaching Demo | Silk Road | Eastern Civilization | February 28, 2020

Teaching Demo (February 28, 2020)

Additional criteria for the position of Associate Professor includes the publication of research in peer reviewed journals relevant to the study area.

Three publications are required:

Prince of Songkla University | Faculty of International Studies

How to Conduct a Systematic Review | Online Research Presentation and Webinar | Steven A Martin, PhD

This online presentation and videotaped webinar suggests a strategy so powerful that they can lead you to master and publish scientific research papers in your chosen field of study. A systematic literature review is a ‘silver bullet’, a straightforward methodology once applied in medical research, now available in the social sciences.

INTRODUCTION TO THE SYSTEMATIC REVIEW – FOUNDATION FOR LONG-TERM SUCCESS IN RESEARCH AND WRITING IN THE SOCIAL SCIENCES

New 2022 Publication | From Shades of Grey to Web of Science | Systematic Review

Martin, S. A. (2022). From shades of grey to Web of Science: A systematic review of surf tourism research in international journals (2011-2020). Journal of Sport & Tourismhttps://doi.org/10.1080/14775085.2022.2037453

2020 VIDEOTAPED WEBINAR

Webinar | How to conduct a systematic review | 1:20:46

PRESENTATION OUTLINE

  • The powerful secret.
  • Identifying types of literature.
  • Inclusion and exclusion of studies.
  • Grey literature.
  • Developing annotated bibliographies.
  • Organizing files and folders.
  • Case example – Surf tourism.
  • Case example – Thai geography.
  • Conclusion – The silver bullet.
  • Suggestions and opportunities.
  • Relevant resources

PRESENTATION SLIDES | PDF

Presentation slides | How to conduct a systematic review

Systematic Literature Review Infographic

BENEFITS OF A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

  • Desk research (i.e. field research is not required).
  • Highly publishable as a research in its own right.
  • Highly citable once published.
  • Serves as a “super literature review” for future articles.
  • Mastery of the literature and subject area (long-term benefits).
  • Familiarity with scholars in the field of study.
  • Identification of knowledge gaps, hence justification of future research areas.
  • Results in a database of authors, files, references for future works.
  • Lead to future trend and meta-analyses.
  • Identify avenues for the publication of your research.

EXAMPLE 1 | SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF SURF TOURISM RESEARCH | JOURNAL OF SPORT AND TOURISM

Systematic review of surf tourism research | Journal of Sport and Tourism

Examples: Systematic reviews of surf tourism research

Martin, S. A., & Assenov, I. (2012). The genesis of a new body of sport tourism literature: A systematic review of surf tourism research (1997-2011). Journal of Sport and Tourism, 17(4) 257–28

Martin, S. A. (2022). From shades of grey to Web of Science: A systematic review of surf tourism research in international journals (2011-2020). Journal of Sport & Tourism, 26(2) 125–146. https://doi.org/10.1080/14775085.2022.2037453

EXAMPLE 2 | THAI GEOGRAPHY LITERATURE REVIEW AND RESEARCH | SINGAPORE JOURNAL OF TROPICAL GEOGRAPHY

Thai geography literature review and research | Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography

Martin, S. A., & Ritchie, R. J. (2020). Sourcing Thai geography literature for ASEAN and international education. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography41(1) 61–85.

CONNECT

Connect on Google Scholar

Connect on ResearchGate

Thank you for visiting my Systematic Review Page.

I hope you enjoyed this online research presentation and webinar. If you feel motivated to learn more about this research methodology, or would like to arrange for me to give a public talk, please let me know – I’d love to hear from you.

–Steven Martin

A Taiwan knowledge keeper of indigenous Bunun – An ethnographic historical narrative of Laipunuk (內本鹿), southern mountain range

A Taiwan knowledge keeper of indigenous Bunun – An ethnographic historical narrative of Laipunuk (內本鹿), southern mountain range

Asst Professor Dr Steven A Martin

Assistant Professor of Asian Studies in Sociology and Anthropology

NEW RESEARCH WITH SAGE PUBLISHING AND ETHNOGRAPHY

Faculty of International Studies | University News

Abstract

This paper offers an ethnographic life history account of a Bunun hunter, Tama Biung Istanda, from Laipunuk, Taiwan, based on academic research and fieldwork. Audio-visual tapes recorded by the author in Taitung County, Taiwan, were reviewed and translated alongside extant Chinese, Japanese and English sources. The study constructs a remembered life into readable coherent sequences on behalf of an indigenous peoples, many of whom now seek international recognition as part of their struggle for essential entitlements such as land rights, access to traditional hunting grounds, and other natural, legal, and cultural resources. The testimony of Tama Biung Istanda, translated into English and summarised here for future generations, provides a compelling new source of data on the Bunun heritage that can help to assist knowledge for the local and scholarly community and cultural resource management practices.

Keywords: Bunun, ethnohistory, hunting, Japanese Colony of Taiwan, Laipunuk or Neibenlu (內本鹿), Taiwanese (Formosan) indigenous peoples

Figures 1-7

Click on images to enlarge.

Figure 1: Bunun at the Asahi Police Station, Laipunuk 1933

Figure 2: Map of southern Taiwan featuring the Laipunuk watershed

Figure 3: Map of Laipunuk villages, the Japanese cordon trail and police stations, and the 2006 Bunun root-searching expedition across the Central Range

Figure 4: Remains of the Japanese police station cordon trail above the Lu Ye River, Laipunuk

Figure 5: Interview setup with Nabu Istanda (left), Langus Istanda (informant’s sister, centre); and Biung Istanda (right).

Figure 6: Ethnohistorical Narrative Research Flow Chart

Figure 7: Tama Biung Istanda (1917-2007) Taiwan knowledge keeper of indigenous Bunun | Laipunuk 內本鹿 Nei Ben Lu

References in journal format | Ethnography 

  • Adawai JP (2020) Taiwan. In: Mamo, D (ed) The Indigenous World 2020. Copenhagen: Eks-Skolen Trykkeri.
  • Binkinuaz T (Tsai SS) (2006) Laipunuk Bunun Tribal Migration Before 1942. Master’s thesis, National Chengchi University, Taipei. (in Chinese).
  • Brown M (2004) Is Taiwan Chinese? The Impact of Culture, Power and Migration on Changing Identities. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Campbell WM (1903) Formosa Under the Dutch. Taipei: SMC Publishing Inc. 2001.
  • Chu H (2010) Disciplining and Cultivating the Colonized: Literary Representations of Ethnic Relations between Japanese Policemen and Taiwanese People. Journal of Taiwan Literature Research 10: 117 – 148. (in Chinese).
  • Council of Indigenous Peoples (2020a) National Aboriginal Population by Nationality and Age. (in Chinese). Available at: www.apc.gov.tw/portal/ (accessed 15 May 2020).
  • Council of Indigenous Peoples (2020b) Online Dictionary of Indigenous Ethnic Languages (in Chinese). Available at: e-dictionary.apc.gov.tw/Index.htm (accessed 15 May 2020).
  • Davidson JW (1903) The Island of Formosa Past and Present. Taipei: SMC Publishing Inc. 2005.
  • Fang C (2016) Transforming Tradition in Eastern Taiwan: Bunun Incorporation of Christianity in their Spirit Relationships. Doctoral dissertation, Australian National University, Canberra.
  • Huang YK (1988) Conversion and Religious Change among the Bunun of Taiwan. Doctoral dissertation, London School of Economics and Political Science, London.
  • Huang YK (2001a) Lost Laipunuk: Outside social and across tribal boundaries. Journal of Eastern Taiwan Studies 6: 139–172. (in Chinese).
  • Huang YK (2001b) Taitung County history - Bunun Zu. Taitung County: Taitung County Government. (in Chinese).
  • Huang YK (1995) The ‘Great Man’ Model Among the Bunun of Taiwan. In Austronesian Studies Relating to Taiwan (eds.) Li, P, Tsang, C, Huang, Y, Ho, D, and Tseng, 57–107. Taipei: Academia Sinica.
  • Langness LL and Frank G (1981) Lives: An Anthropological Approach to Biography. Novato, CA: Chandler and Sharp Publishers, Inc.
  • Lee H and Cho Y (2012) Introduction: Colonial Modernity and Beyond in East Asian Contexts. Cultural Studies 26(5): 601–616.
  • Li PJ (1988) A comparative study of Bunun dialects. Bulletin of the Institute of History and Philology (BIHP) 59(2): 479–508.
  • Li LL (2018) A Grammar of Isbukun Bunun. Doctoral dissertation. National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan.
  • Linde C (1993) Life Stories: The Creation of Coherence. Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Martin SA (2006) Ethnohistorical Perspectives among the Bunun: A Case Study of Laipunuk Taiwan. Master’s thesis, National Cheng-Chi University, Taipei.
  • Martin SA (2011a) Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu)—the Last Frontier of the Taiwan Aborigines During the Japanese Occupation on Taiwan: Ethnographic Narratives of a Bunun Elder. The International Journal of Asia Pacific Studies (IJAS) 7(1): 123–142.
  • Martin SA (2011b) Rebuilding Mama’s House—An Ethnohistorical Reconstruction and Homecoming of the Bunun on Taiwan. Journal of International Studies 1(2): 61–78.
  • Martin SA (2020a) Ethnographic film and Bunun oral history in southern Taiwan. Available at: StevenAndrewMartin.com/ethnographic-film/ (accessed 15 June 2020).
  • Martin SA (2020b) Tama Biung Istanda Ethnography Laipunuk 內本鹿 Taiwan. University Filmworks. Available at: YouTube.com/TamaBiung (accessed 15 June 2020).
  • Martin SA (2014) Contextualizing Island Formosa Through Cultural Heritage, Digital Mapping, And Museology: A New Trial for the Journey Home to the Bunun Villages of Old Laipunuk, Taiwan. Paper presented at the 2014 International Conference on Formosan Indigenous Peoples: Contemporary Perspectives, 15–17 September 2014, Taipei.
  • Martin SA and Blundell D (2017) Cultural Continuum among the Bunun of Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu), Southern Taiwan. In Religion, law and state: Cultural Re-Invigoration in the New Age, (eds.) Chang, H and Mona, A, 215–246. Taipei: Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines.
  • Mao LC (2003) East Taiwan View. Taipei: Yuen-Ming Wen Hua. (in Chinese).
  • Neihardt JG (1932) Black Elk Speaks. New York: William Morrow & Co.
  • Palalavi H (2006) Bunun: the Origin of Tribes and the History of Tribal Migration. Taipei: Council of Indigenous Peoples. (in Chinese).
  • Poyer L and Tsai F (2019) Wartime Experiences and Indigenous Identities in the Japanese Empire. Journal of Military and Strategic Studies 19(2): 41–70.
  • Radin P (1913) Personal Reminiscences of a Winnebago Indian. Journal of American Folklore 26: 293–318.
  • Savage PE and Brown S (2014) Mapping music: Cluster analysis of song-type frequencies within and between cultures. Ethnomusicology, 58(1) (Winter 2014): 133–155.
  • Simon S (2005) Paths to Autonomy: Aboriginality and the Nation in Taiwan. Unpublished paper. Ottawa: University of Ottawa.
  • Simon S (2006) Formosa’s First Nations and the Japanese: From Colonial Rule to Postcolonial Resistance. The Asia-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus 4(1): 1–13.
  • Simon S (2012) Politics and Headhunting among the Formosan Sejiq: Ethnohistorical Perspectives. Oceania 82(2): 164–185.
  • Sturge K (2014) Translation Strategies in Ethnography. Translator 3(1): 21–38.
  • Tsai F (2011) From Dulan to New Guinea. Taipei: Yushangshe. (in Chinese).
  • Yang SY (2005) Imagining the state: An ethnographic study. Ethnography 6(4): 487–516.
  • Yang SY (2011) Cultural performance and the reconstruction of tradition among the Bunun of Taiwan. Oceania 81(3): 316–330.
  • Yang SY (2015) The Indigenous Land Rights Movement and Embodied Knowledge in Taiwan, in Social Movements and the Production of Knowledge. In Body, Practice, and Society in East Asia (ed.) Hirai, KE, 25–43, Senri Ethnological Studies 91.
  • Yeh J (1995) The Migration History of Bunun in Kaohsiung County: the Reasons of Migration and the Change of the Concept of Settlement. Master’s thesis, National Taiwan University, Taipei. (in Chinese).

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank David Blundell, Elizabeth Zeitoun, and the two anonymous reviewers for helping me further my argument. Special thanks to Nabu Istanda and Tommie Williamson (1955-2017) for the years we shared during this project.

2005 Field Research

Nabu Istanda teaching an Amis student at Mamahav village in Laipunuk 內本鹿 Nei Ben Lu | 2005

Steven Martin and Dahu Istanda below Mamahav village in Laipunuk 內本鹿 Nei Ben Lu | 2005

Searching & Referencing for Academic Papers

Searching & Referencing for Academic Papers

805–008 Searching and Referencing | 2 credit (30 hour) online audiovisual conferencing course.

Course description: Discovering and reading literature reviews, opinion papers and research articles; composing a literature review to support a position; using scholarly writing techniques and citations following APA style.

How to Improve your Scholarly Writing – Searching and Referencing for Literature Reviews and Research Articles 

Course lecturer's resources and examples

Previously taught courses of relevance

Featured Webinar | How to develop a systematic review

Webinar | How to conduct a systematic review | 1:20:46


TOPIC 1

How to distinguish APA and other academic formatting styles

APA Manual 7th | Source: American Psychological Association (2020)

Generally, academic writing adheres to a given style guide or 'school of style'. Common examples include APA (American Psychological Association), CMS (Chicago Manual of Style) and MLA (Modern Language Association).

Example: MLA Style | My 1999 freshman paper | Toponymy of Hawaii

Many publishers of books and journals suggest the Harvard Citation Style (i.e. author-date referencing) although there is actually no official guideline or institutional connection. However, the Harvard University Press does have its own code of formatting author-date citations and reference lists.

Note that publishers of international journals often have unique citation and referencing formats.

While it is important to recognize a variety of formatting styles in academic writing and publishing, our course will focus on undergraduate students gaining proficiency in APA style.


TOPIC 2

How to develop an APA reference list – a brief Introduction

Note: a "reference list" is generally the "works cited" in your paper, while a "bibliography" might include a comprehensive list of literature relevant to your research or thesis.

APA reference example for a journal article | Source: American Psychological Association (2020)

Some examples of sources which require referencing

  • Books
  • Book chapters
  • Journal articles
  • Conference papers
  • Conference presentations
  • Websites and webpages

Worksheets for today's lesson

Due to website formatting limitations, the required APA 1/2 inch hanging indent is not shown in the examples below.

APA references | Books and book chapters

Winichakul, T. (1997). Siam mapped: A history of the geo-body of a nation. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press.

Martin, S. A., & Blundell, D. (2017). Cultural continuum among the Bunun of Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu), southern Taiwan. In H. Chang & A. Mona (Eds.), Religion, law and state: Cultural re-invigoration in the new age (pp. 215-246). Taipei, Taiwan: Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines.

APA reference entries for books | 4:26

APA references | Journals and other periodicals

Martin, S. A. (2011). Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu)–The last frontier of the Taiwan aborigines during the Japanese occupation on Taiwan: Ethnographic narratives of a Bunun elder. The International Journal of Asia Pacific Studies (IJAPS), 7(1) 123–142.

Martin, S. A., & Ritchie, R. J. (2020). Sourcing Thai geography literature for ASEAN and international education. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography41(1) 61–85.

APA reference entries for periodicals | 2:44

APA references | Conferences papers and presentations

Martin, S. A., & Assenov, I. (2012). Towards a surf resource sustainability index: A global model for surf site conservation and Thailand case studyProceedings of the 18th Asia Pacific Tourism Association Annual Conference (APTA) Hospitality & Tourism Education: New Tourism & New Waves (pp. 745–760). Taipei, ROC, June 26–29. Busan, Korea: School of International Tourism, Dong-A University.

Martin, S. A., & Ritchie, R. (2018). Towards an ASEAN community: A scoping study and case for teaching the geography of Thailand in the English languageProceedings of the PSU Phuket International Conference 50th Anniversary Celebration: Creativity and Innovations for Global Development (p. 54). Prince of Songkla University, Phuket, Thailand, March 11–12.


TOPIC 3

How to make APA in-text citations for sentences

APA in-text citation examples | Source: American Psychological Association (2020)

In-text references (or in-text citations) provide a source (author and year of publication) for each piece of information used in your academic writing. In-text citations are commonly placed either at the beginning or end of a sentence or paragraph to identify where information actually came from and are important in order to avoid plagiarism.

Plagiarism is the use of the published work of another person without acknowledgement and is easily avoidable by using an in-text citation to indicate who the original author/s is/are.

Worksheets for today's lesson

APA format | In-text citations, quotations, paraphrases to avoid plagiarism | 3:20


TOPIC 4

How to make an annotated bibliography

Annotated bibliography example in APA style

According to the Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL, 2020), “Depending on the purpose of your bibliography, some annotations may summarize, some may assess or evaluate a source, and some may reflect on the source’s possible uses for the project at hand.”

Worksheets for today's lesson

APA format | Annotated bibliography and helpful advice | 6:10


TOPIC 5

How to organize research files and develop a database

Literature Review File Organization Concept


TOPIC 6

How to develop a literature review I Midterm project guidelines

Topic selection and outline

  • Write a comprehensive literature review based on the topics and annotated bibliographies as developed, discussed and approved during our previous lessons.
  • The literature review should follow the APA style for in-text citations and references.

The literature review consists of five parts

  1. A brief introduction.
  2. Three to five relevant subtopics of at least two paragraphs each.
  3. Brief discussion or conclusion highlighting key points of interest and/or knowledge gaps (if any).
  4. Brief suggestions for future research.
  5. A reference list with at least 15 sources representing journals, books, websites, etc.

Formatting

  • Spacing: 1.5.
  • Font: Times New Roman 12pt.
  • Length: 1,500 to 2,000 words.
  • Referencing: APA style (American Psychological Association)

TOPIC 7

How to use Google Scholar for searching and referencing

Assignment

  • Select a topic of your choice.
  • Search Google Scholar to locate 3 to 5 relevant international journal articles.
  • Conduct searches for (1) the topic and (2) relevant scholars in the field.
  • In APA format, make reference list in MS Word and email it to the instructor.

TOPIC 8

How to use ResearchGate for searching and referencing

Assignment

  • Join ResearchGate.
  • Select a topic relevant to your final paper (systematic review).
  • Search ResearchGate for relevant scholars in the field.
  • Contact at least two researchers about their research.

TOPIC 9

How to use YouTube for searching and referencing

Video, documentary film and scholarly presentations: the case of YouTube in searching and referencing online educational films and videos

With digital transformations in education, online films and videos bring to light more than just content, we are exposed to – and adapt to – the use of technology in teaching and learning. For example, searching and referencing videos on YouTube suggest an awareness of search strategies one might employ while identifying diverse genres of videos and experts in a given field or topic area.

In the case of searching and referencing Greece and Asia Minor videos – free and available on YouTube – the following genres come to light and are explored.

  • Academic lectures and presentations
  • Mainstream documentary films and series
  • Diverse videos of interest
  • Animated video presentations
  • Travel videos and vlogs

Searching and Referencing | Greece and Asia Minor Documentary Film Page

Assignment

  • Select a topic (it can be relevant to your final paper).
  • Search on YouTube for related videos.
  • Locate five relevant videos representing each of the genres as discussed in class, including (1) academic lectures and presentations, (2) mainstream documentary films and series, (3) diverse videos of interest, (4) animated video presentations, and (5) travel videos and vlogs.
  • Make a reference for each video which includes an active URL.

How to cite a video in APA | 1:45


TOPIC 10

How to use Wikipedia for searching and referencing | Do's and Dont's

In this lesson, we explore the power of Wikipedia in research and learn how to track down appropriate and citable references to use in our work.

  • Why we don't cite Wikipedia and how to use it as a resource

Lesson and worksheet forthcoming.


TOPIC 11

How to access academic journals and databases at the university

Many academic journals and databases require a subscription or fee to view or download articles. For students and researchers at PSU Phuket, our university has purchased subscriptions to a variety of journals and databases.

You may need to login on campus or through the Prince of Songkla University Phuket Campus Library in order to gain access. This will allow journals and databases to automatically verify the PSU IP address.

Shortist of online databases


TOPIC 12

How to conduct a systematic review | Final project

Building a foundation for long-term success in research and writing in the social sciences

Webinar | How to conduct a systematic review | 1:20:46

Presentation slides | How to conduct a systematic review

Systematic Literature Review Infographic

Systematic review of surf tourism research | Journal of Sport and Tourism

Systematic reviews of surf tourism research

Martin, S. A., & Assenov, I. (2012). The genesis of a new body of sport tourism literature: A systematic review of surf tourism research (1997-2011). Journal of Sport and Tourism, 17(4) 257–28. https://doi.org/10.1080/14775085.2013.766528

Martin, S. A. (2022). From shades of grey to Web of Science: A systematic review of surf tourism research in international journals (2011-2020). Journal of Sport & Tourism, 26(2) 125–146. https://doi.org/10.1080/14775085.2022.2037453

Thai Geography academic literature review and research

Academic review of Thai geography literature

Martin, S. A., & Ritchie, R. J. (2020). Sourcing Thai geography literature for ASEAN and international education. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography41(1) 61–85.


How to publish papers in international journals

Coordinator : Assoc. Prof. Dr. Raymond J. Ritchie

For the scholar who studies or works in a university, doing scholarly research and publishing the findings in the form of articles in peer-reviewed international journals are some of the most important academic activities. It is important to learn how to do it yourself so you can set-up your own career.

This workshop includes a number of advanced topics regarding how to publish a paper in international journals. It is very good opportunity for learning from the experience and techniques of an experienced publisher of papers. Emphasis is on practical information on how to do it, and what Dr. Ritchie has leant from experience, that is, what works and what does not.

Searching and Referencing | Prof Dr Steven A Martin | Teaching and Learning Resources | Google Search

Forthcoming sections for teaching and learning

3 parts of this course

  1. Searching and sources
  2. Citation and referencing
  3. Annotations and literature reviews

2 required projects (midterm and final)

  1. Literature review
  2. Systematic review

Other

  • How to include foreign language references
Searching and Referencing | Prof Dr Steven A Martin | Teaching and Learning Resources
Dr Steven A Martin and University Filmworks discover “What Makes a University Great?” at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Dr Steven A Martin and University Filmworks discover “What Makes a University Great?” at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University

UniversityFilmworks.com

Dr Steven A Martin and University Filmworks discover "What Makes a University Great?" at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University School of Hotel and Tourism Management

What Makes a University Great? | Click to Program Playlist on YouTube...

Dr Steven Martin wrote and hosted this short film under the direction of Edward E. Vaughan. The video explores the Hong Kong Polytechnic University’s School of Hotel and Tourism Management (SHTM) and focuses on the story of leadership and the Dean of School, Prof. Kaye Chon. The video was produced by University Filmworks.

At SHTM, Steven discovers a little universe where students, teachers and industry professionals come together with outstanding synergy, uncovering a story of outstanding educators and leadership.

What Makes A University Great? | Dr. Steven A. Martin Productions | University Filmworks

Cultural Continuum among the Bunun of Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu), Southern Taiwan (Book Chapter)

Cultural Continuum among the Bunun of Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu), Southern Taiwan (Book Chapter)

Chapter 8 | Cultural Continuum among the Bunun of Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu), Southern Taiwan | Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines

Religion, law and state: Cultural re-invigoration in the new age | Ch. 8 – Cultural Continuum among the Bunun of Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu), Southern Taiwan | Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines

Martin, S. A., & Blundell, D. (2017). Cultural continuum among the Bunun of Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu), southern Taiwan (pp. 215–246). In H. Chang and A. Mona [C. Tsai] (Eds.), Religion, law and state: Cultural re-invigoration in the new age. Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines and SMC: Taipei.

Press Release | Faculty of International Studies

20th anniversary of Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines

In 2014, Dr. Martin, was invited to Taiwan to celebrate the 20th anniversary of Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines in cooperation with Academia Sinica, the foremost research institute in Taipei, ROC. The Museum offered Steven a place in their upcoming publication, a book to commemorate their 20th anniversary: Religion, Law and State: Cultural Re-invigoration in the New Age.

After three years of communication and collaboration, the Museum’s book has been published and is now available to English and Chinese readers.

About the research

Steven’s research was focused on the remote, high-mountain jungle valley of Laipunuk (內本鹿), in the inaccessible mountains of southern Taiwan, home of the Bunun tribe, the last Taiwanese headhunters.

Having lived with the Bunun tribespeople for five years, he recorded their ways of life, their songs, their traditions and their histories, as part of an oral ethnography project.

According to Steven, “Taiwan is the source of the centuries-long process of the peopling of the Pacific, the so-called ‘Pacific Rainbow’ that maps the migration of peoples, materials and languages across the islands of the Pacific, from Taiwan all the way across to Hawaii.”

Speaking for the Faculty of International Studies (FIS), Steven shared his experience:

Their stories are the last of their kind, and it was an immense privilege to have the opportunity to document their lives.”


Martin, S. A., & Blundell, D. (2017). Cultural continuum among the Bunun of Laipunuk (Nei Ben Lu), southern Taiwan (Ch. 8) (pp. 215–246). In H. Chang and A. Mona [C. Tsai] (Eds.), Religion, law and state: Cultural re-invigoration in the new age. Shung Ye Museum of Formosan Aborigines and SMC: Taipei.

Abstract

Over the past century, the Bunun people, an Austronesian-speaking indigenous culture of Taiwan, have withstood acute marginalization resulting from outside incursion, particularly from the Japanese (1895–1945) and the Nationalist Government (since 1945). However, in recent years democratic reforms ushered in opportunities for cultural conservation and new sustainability through cultural resource management. This research is focused on a particular group of Is-bukun Bunun speakers from the high-mountain villages of Laipunuk, Yen-Ping Township, Taitung County, Southern Taiwan. It seeks to identify aspects of intersystem cultural continuum amidst acute social change induced by external pressures. The research employed the translation of rare Chinese documents and interpretation by scholars in the discipline, the recordation of oral history through video and audio devices, by in-depth interview, and through participant observation. The study found that the Bunun have demonstrated profound cultural resilience in the contexts of ritual dance, marriage, hunting, religion, and the identification of place. Cultural traditions and behaviors were often modified and adapted to fit within the cultural norms and expectations of dominant cultures, yet deep intrinsic meanings were carried forward, crossing spiritual and generational gaps. The research offers a window to Bunun epistemology and cultural systematics, exploring how indigenous peoples perpetuate their beliefs and values through internal cultural transformation; it serves to document the home-grown cultural resource management of a Taiwanese human treasure for English readers.

Keywords: Southern Taiwan, Bunun, Laipunuk, Formosan indigenous, Bunun Cultural and Educational Foundation, historical cultural continuum